Oklahoma State University
Banner
Oklahoma Invasive Species
Oklahoma State University

Autumn Olive
"Autumn Olive, Elaeagnus, Oleaster, Japanese Silverberry"
Elaeagnus umbellate

autumm olive
Country of Origin: Eastern Europe
History: Autumn olive has commonly been used as an ornamental plant. It was introduced to North America in the 1800s from eastern Europe.
Intended Use: Ornamental
Mode of Invasion:

Crowds out native plants species.
Somewhat drought tolerant.

Species Description:

A large deciduous shrub that can grow to 20 feet. Leaves are alternately arranged, elliptic to lancelet (shaped like a lance head), and smooth-edged. Mature leaves have a dense covering of lustrous silvery scales on the lower surface. Stems and buds also have silvery scales. Flowers are small, creamy white to yellow and tubular in shape; they grow in small clusters. The abundant fruits look like small pink berries, also with silvery scales. Autumn olive is easily confused with Russian olive, which has many similar characteristics. Unlike autumn olive, Russian olive often has stiff peg-like thorns, and has silvery scales coating both sides of its mature leaves.

Map of Occurrence:

map
Current U.S. distribution
http://plants.usda.gov/maps/large/EL/ELUM.png

map
Image of reported invasive
http://www.nps.gov/plants/ALIEN/map/elum1.htm

Effects of Invasion: Crowds out native speciesĀ 
Control:
  • Preventing this plant from establishing and colonizing is the best management option.
  • Remove colonizing plants as soon as possible if found doing so.
  • Hand-pulling is an option if the plant is still small enough
  • Herbicide treatment is the best method for eradication
  • Herbicide options include cut-stump and foliar applications.
References:

http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/plants/autmnolive.shtml

 

http://plants.usda.gov/maps/large/EL/ELUM.png

 

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELUM

 

http://www.invasive.org/search/action.cfm?q=autumn%20olive

 

http://www.umext.maine.edu/onlinepubs/htmpubs/2525.htm

 

http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/elan1.htm